Creative Virtue Press/Telical Books

Symmetry Therapy -- A Non-Medical Awareness-Based Practice of Being Conscious of Symmetries in the Body.

Download the Symmetry Therapy Booklet Rough Draft PDF. Click on it also to view it on most web browsers.

New Version of this website:

Please consult your physician before beginning this or any other exercise program. Even though there are few movements during these relaxation techniques, misunderstanding the exercises might cause beginners to move in a way not intended.

This practice makes no claim on being a medical help to heal any condition. It does not claim to replace any health practice but instead help educate the public.

Symmetry Therapy is a non-medical awareness-based study based on being conscious of the symmetries in the body. The main concern of Symmetry Therapy is to educate people about the need for muscle relaxation and body alignment as they go throughout life. A basic awareness of the symmetries of the body at various times throughout the day is the awareness people need which, over a long period of time, may help give them release of muscle tension. The concepts of the symmetries of the body helps create the force of attention required to release body tension. This practice makes no claim on being a medical help to heal any condition. It does not claim to replace any health practice but instead help educate the public. The practice is done lying flat on the ground. The force of gravity helps the body to adjust itself so that small tensions are released.

It is said that people get smaller as they age because of muscle tension which is unnoticed and held in the body. This muscle tension is actually distributed over the whole of the body.

Symmetry Therapy states that the body has obvious symmetries between the right and left side, but also important ones in the top and bottom halves that we take for granted. Such symmetries are the hands and feet, the elbows and knees, the wrists and ankles, the shoulders and hips, the head and genitals, the long bones of the arms and legs, and many others. Awareness of these parts of the body helps us to align the body naturally. The focus on the body and consciously relaxing muscles takes a long time, and noticing the symmetry of the body is one way in which one can prolong this awareness.

Why would something like Symmetry Therapy help with health? Simple muscle relaxation and deep breathing will help with health and these are two benefits of doing Symmetry Therapy. When doing Symmetry Therapy one focuses on breathing full, deep breathes and also focuses on relaxing the muscles. This author believes it is impossible for an adult to breathe deeply or relax their muscles without conscious effort created by prolonged attention. These are called "soft exercises" which people often do not do. Doing soft exercises can help them doing hard exercises. Also, when laying on the ground and doing these practices, there are all these adjustments that are made that simply something like a relaxation recording can not produce. One is not doing yoga, only instead a very light stretching. There is a sound that people make more and more when they age. It sounds like a "cracking" and it's actually the release of tiny air bubbles in the joints.

Symmetry Therapy creates a state of mind-body relationship that is very connected. After a session, one's attention is divided on the body and on whatever else in life that one has to pay attention. Having an awareness of the body helps one have a connection to the mental and emotional state, as the three are interconnected. This is being touted by hundreds of thousands of body-mind therapists all over globe. As valuable as their services are, many cannot afford their services. Symmetry Therapy is a technique that anyone can understand and practice. It may take a little more effort to get certain results than having someone help you, but, with effort, good results can be obtained.

Symmetry Therapy has no connection to Eastern Philosophy like not only Yoga, Tai Chi, Chi Gung have but many other healing modalities do as well. This is important because many want to keep their Judeo-Christian or even secular worldview. Some are taught not to do Yoga because of these connections.

Work on focusing on body symmetry can break down the relationship of coarse psychological impressions of ourselves and the events in our life into finer and finer ones,

We must take the mass of ourselves and expose it to the effect of the main part of the work on body symmetry, which is a divided attention throughout the day when one remembers it, to be able to sense the body symmetries as one goes throughout the day and not forget completely about them.

There is an equation that shows the overall level of physical "regeneration" that a person keeps going as they age. The equation is thus: the amount of impulse that is sent to the muscles by the will to relax the muscles, has a special relation to how much life impels us to stress ourselves. This stress is the result of the psychological distress formed and kept in check in the body by the interpretation of life's natural stresses, and how the impulse sent to the muscles to relax them counteracts this natural psychological distress.

There is something very spiritual about having the symmetry of the body present in the body mind, or traced in the unconscious. People talk about how yoga or other types of exercises strengthen the body to allow spiritual energies pass through us. Jesus talked about giving us the water that would flow out of out belly like living water. Whatever path one chooses, even one that denies an external spirituality and relies on brain sciences alone, higher emotions and even higher modes of thinking would be buttressed by a body that is grounded, and centered.

The basic technique is very simple

1) Lay flat on the ground, arms at the side, fingertips gently touching the ground
2) Observe the top and bottom, left and right, symmetries of the body
3) Give relaxation commands to every part of the body.
4) Stay on the ground for at least fifteen minutes, preferably one hour. Doing exercise variations during this time is OK, but come back to the relaxation posture.

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Old Version of this website: This practice makes no claim on being a medical help to heal any condition. It does not claim to replace any health practice but instead help educate the public.

Symmetry Therapy is a non-medical awareness-based study based on being conscious of the symmetries in the body. The main concern of Symmetry Therapy is to educate people about the need for muscle relaxation and body alignment as they go throughout life. A basic awareness of the symmetries of the body at various times throughout the day is the awareness people need which, over a long period of time, may help give them release of muscle tension. The concepts of the symmetries of the body helps create the force of attention required to release body tension. This practice makes no claim on being a medical help to heal any condition. It does not claim to replace any health practice but instead help educate the public. The practice is done lying flat on the ground. The force of gravity helps the body to adjust itself so that small tensions are released.

It is said that people get smaller as they age because of muscle tension which is unnoticed and held in the body. This muscle tension is actually distributed over the whole of the body. For an example of an exercise which may remove it, click here.

Symmetry Therapy states that the body has obvious symmetries between the right and left side, but also important ones in the top and bottom halves which we take for granted. Such symmetries are the hands and feet, the elbows and knees, the wrists and ankles, the shoulders and hips, the head and genitals, the long bones of the arms and legs, and many others. Awareness of these parts of the body helps us to align the body naturally. The focus on the body and consciously relaxing muscles takes a long time, and noticing the symmetry of the body is one way in which one can prolong this awareness.

Some Symmetry Therapy techniques are practiced while laying on the floor and take very basic postures such as raising the arms in a prayer position, or having the knees up with the feet flat on the ground. These are similar to the Feldenkrais style of Awareness through Movement exercises that Pearson recommends and has practiced for years. Others, can be practiced as one goes throughout the day. Guided relaxation affirmations are also an integral part of this discipline as is deep breathing.

This practice makes no claim on being a medical help to heal any condition. It does not claim to replace any health practice but instead help educate the public. These symmetry exercises work so well because you lay flat on your back and your body naturally weighs you down and forces your body to somewhat align over the 20 minutes or so that you do these simple awareness, or gentle movement, exercises.

The MP3's were recorded while Pearson was doing the exercises himself. They are not polished and sterile, and one may feel a sense of relaxation as he goes through the exercises himself.

Here are some basic Symmetry Therapy practices in text format.

Right click on any of the following to save the target as an mp3 you can play anywhere mp3s can be played. Feel free to make CD's from the mp3s for seniors or others who use the CD format.

Here is a basic Audio MP3 File of an Introductory Symmetry Therapy practice -- This file is about twenty minutes long.

Here is a Symmetry_Therapy_Core_Exercise
Symmetry_Therapy_Cross_Exercise
Symmetry_Therapy_Eyes_and_Head
Symmetry_Therapy_Foot_Relaxation
Symmetry_Therapy_Four_Speaking_Peace_into_Body
Symmetry_Therapy_Hand_Relaxation
Symmetry_Therapy_Hips_and_Shoulders
Symmetry_Therapy_Lesson_2
Symmetry_Therapy_Lower_Back_Relaxation
Symmetry_Therapy_Lesson_2
Symmetry_Therapy_Shoulders_Two
Symmetry_Therapy_Sitting_Exercise
Symmetry_Therapy_Standing_2
Symmetry_Therapy_Tailbone_Practice
Symmetry_Therapy_Lesson_Three
Symmetry_Therapy_Upper_Back_Relaxation

All material is copyrighted 2006 - 2012 by Robert Pearson. Permission is given to distribute this information, including audio files, provided it is done free of charge and in a non-exclusive manner. All other rights reserved.

Please feel free to contact the author with any comments.

(Note)

This section is probably going to be modified. Truth is, I do not like to be associated with the kind of person creating any kind of physical or exercise "therapy" because it makes me look like a quack, jack-of-all trades, and so on. I'm thinking of calling this "Exercises in Teaching the Elderly the Value of Symmetry Awareness," or something like that. I learned much of this from studying Feldenkrais, which is not something that many people have access to, and Yoga is believed too difficult for many people. Yoga is falsely believed to be too difficult, but it's true most people by the age of 50 cannot do many Yoga postures).

How would you feel if you stumbled upon something and it seemed like you should call it an "ism"? It's one of the worse feelings for a modern person, isn't it? Why is that? Are we taught to think that only crackpots do these kinds of things? Is that the message the media is sending out?

I realize that atheletes in their movement are constantly thinking of the balance and symmetry of their bodies, but it's something people who are no longer atheletic rarely consciously do. I also developed some interesting ideas about the divided attention put throughout the day on the top and bottom symmetries of the body, as explained below, that I would like to popularize in some way. It does seem to help the body and mind cooridinate into proper alignment in gentle ways.

I'm interested in getting people's thoughts on this so for now it will stay up and I take it all with a grain of salt or a slight smile.

(end of note)

Symmetry Therapy was developed by Robert Pearson (pen name R.S. Pearson) after studying yoga, Feldenkrais, and other disciplines. While he doesn't credit it for solving his problem, it seems like an extension of some of the ideas in those systems. Pearson developed a mild skeletal musculuar problem even while practicing Feldenkrais. Acupuncture did not help and even seemed to make it worse after two particular treatments. The only thing that helped was practicing almost daily a regimen created by a Western physical therapist. Pearson realized that anything that has the power to help someone, could also have the power to hurt. He was tired of the "hubris" of some well-meaning alternative health practitioners, and wanted to create a basic study of some important awarenesses experienced in yoga, Feldenkrais, chiropractic and other similar techniques, as well as in the meridian aspect of acupuncture.

To coin a term for a new "therapy" may seem odd, but the world is "ism-producing" machine. There have been over ten major types of "body-mind" or "body work" techniques developed over the last twenty years alone. Universities and artists develop new "-isms" and "-ologies" all the time -- it is just a requirement of progress. You must coin a new idea when it is sufficiently different from the rest.

Pearson believes we are at a crucial time in the history of health care and capitalism, where too many health-based practices have a price tag on them. Pearson was a close personal friend and student of Margo Geiger of Long Island, New York, who was well aware of alternative health practices since the 1940s. He was exposed to macrobiotic diets, chiropractic, massage, foot reflexology, color therapy, homeopathy, Bach Flower treatments, and many other practices from Margo since age 15 (he is currently 43). She did this kind of work for anyone and almost always for free. Upon moving to Seattle in 1982, he became aware that almost everyone charged people for these same services. Pearson understands why this is but wonders if the health of some people decreases because of a type of codependence when people believe they can't help themselves or even form partnerships to encourage each other. As well as studying with Margo Geiger, Pearson started practicing Hatha Yoga at age 15.

The dangerous possibility of meeting lower-quality practitioners and trying to find what people can do on their own led to the development of Symmetry Therapy techniques. Symmetry Therapy endorses practices such as Yoga, chiropractic, Feldenkrais, acupuncture and others and realizes it cannot give what the best of these can give to people who have serious problems. It also suggests that people drawn to alternative practices for serious skeletal-musculature problems consider consulting a certified physical therapist. Sometimes only a daily regimen can help such problems, since one must live in their body daily, and hence one must alter it daily themselves. Just as nutritional awareness is now highly understood and practiced, hopefully the bodymind/body work paradigms will become common public knowledge also. Pearson does not believe this can happen only by esoteric practices like Feldenkrais and other such methods. While he has no pretensions that Symmetry Therapy will ever become popular, he is happy to contribute his part based on his experiences.

Pearson is the author of several books and is writing one on Symmetry Therapy. Excerpts are shared below on this website.


Creative Virtue Press/Telical Books